Job corridor

Question

Answer

How do I apply the insights from the Job Corridor?

The Job Corridor is designed to support future workforce planning. Once you have identified ‘at risk’ jobs via the Job Impact chart, it is useful to scenario test which transitions are viable internally and externally for the employee population in a specific 'at risk' job. You can also use the Job Corridor to assess how to fill your in-demand, high value, future jobs by transitioning existing talent with transferrable skills from ‘at risk’ jobs.

These insights can be used to aid transformation projects, stakeholder engagement and consultation, plans for redeployment, scope new curriculum design, course outsourcing, or redeployment pathway planning.

How do I use the Job Corridor feature?

The Job Corridor models and identifies appropriate future job opportunities and re-skilling pathways (in and beyond an organisation) for workers in ‘at risk’ jobs in two directions:

•From a Current Job to a Target Job; and

•From a Target Job to a Current Job.

How do I identify potential future jobs and re-skilling pathways (Target Jobs) in and beyond my organisation for workers in ‘at risk’ (Current) Jobs?

Ensure the ‘Start From’ button in the top right of the screen is set to Current Job.

1) Select an ‘at risk’ Current Job (left-hand side) that your organisation is reviewing and view the presented Target Jobs (right-hand side) to understand viable transition opportunities.

2) Within the selection of Target Jobs, choose a possible future job to assess.

3) Delve into the re-skilling needs required to move from the Current Job to this particular Target Job. This process is repeatable for all Current Jobs (and relative Target Jobs) to inform workforce strategy and learning and development planning.

How do I fill in-demand future jobs (Target Jobs) by transitioning existing talent (Current Jobs)?

Ensure the ‘Start From’ button in the top right of the screen is set to Target Job. This will swap the ordering of the Current and Target Job columns.

1) Select an in-demand future job (left-hand side) that your organisation wants to fill and view the presented Current Jobs (right-hand side) to understand viable transition opportunities.

2) Within the selection of Current Jobs (right hand side), choose a possible Current Job to transition from.

3) Delve into the re-skilling needs required to move from the Current Job to this particular Target Job. This process is repeatable for all Target Jobs (and relative Current Jobs) to inform workforce strategy and learning and development planning.

What jobs are displayed in the list of

Current and Target Jobs?

When the ‘Start From’ button is set to ‘Current Job’, the Current Jobs list consists of the entire workforce (provided by your organisation) or census dataset.

When the ‘Start From’ button is set to ‘Target Job’ and the ‘Internal / All’ tab on the left is set to ‘Internal’, the Target Jobs are all jobs in your organisation presented in alphabetical order. When the tab is set to ‘All’, this list is an alphabetical list of all the jobs in the Faethm job database and your ‘Internal’ jobs. (Note these job lists are searchable)

You should note, for both of these views the future – ‘Jobs Added’ (which are identified in the Jobs Added chart) have been tagged with an icon. You may decide to focus on these Target Jobs as they are the jobs that may be required in your workforce to implement emerging technologies.

How are the Target (Future) jobs sorted/prioritised when starting with Current Jobs?

Faethm sorts and displays transition opportunities or Target Jobs in order of the highest to lowest relevance to the current job. This hierarchy is determined by an algorithm that analyses how well a job scores against the following five weighted characteristics:

•jobs with future economic growth (determined from data available via the US Bureau of Statistics)

•relativity of salary (to ensure reasonable transitions)

•ease of transfer (similar skill set)

•lower levels of automation risk

•jobs that an individual might actually like to work in based on their identity; values, interests, and behaviours associated with their Current Job.

This results in a Job Pivot score – where a higher number represents an easier pivot to the transition or target opportunity. Faethm recommends focusing in on the jobs that have a pivot score above 75 for greater ease of transfer, shorter time to re-skilling pathways and greater job security in the future.

How are the Current Jobs sorted/prioritised when starting with Target (future, in-demand) Jobs?

Faethm sorts and displays talent sourcing opportunities or Current Jobs in order of a ranked Match Score. The Match Score shows how easily an employee can transition by considering the similarity in job attributes (taking into account all 6 attributes of Skills, Knowledge, Abilities, Activities, Context and Style) as well as similarity in salary. The Knowledge attribute is upweighted (more important) than the other 5 job attributes. Unlike the Pivot Score, the Match Score does not consider job growth or automation rate. As this Match Score helps to quickly identify the closest transition pathways from Current Jobs into in-demand Target Jobs when trying to fill critical jobs or suggest future-proofed careers.

The Target Jobs are sorted in alphabetical order and are searchable.

What is the importance of job attributes
to each job?

Every job in the Faethm database (originally founded from ONET data) is made up of 244 attributes that are classified as either skills, knowledge, abilities, activities, context and style (see definitions on the information icon on the platform). The attributes that characterise each job are reported to ONET (and further mapped by Faethm) by thousands of individuals who work directly in those jobs. Assessments on importance of job attributes to each particular job family are constantly being updated as jobs change over time. This ensures that we have the most up to date understanding of each job characterised in our database.

How is the scale of job attributes calculated and interpreted?

Every job attribute has a value between 0 (not important) and 100 (very important). Each value represents the level of skill or ability required in the job, as determined from ONET's survey of individuals working in those jobs. The skill rating per attribute is normalised to enable standardisation and comparison.

What does the distance between jobs represent, and how is this calculated?


Each job has a calculated distance between every other job in the Faethm database and is presented in the Job Corridor to show recommended job transitions. The ease of transfer is modelled using the cosine-similarity distance measure of each of the job attributes: skills, abilities, knowledge and activities; while values are based on the cosine-similarity distance of the job styles (values and behaviours) and context. The combined variables are used to rank all jobs to help identify the best transition from one job to another.

What do the ‘FTE / %’ toggles do?


The "FTE / %" toggle appears on the left-hand side (next to Current Jobs in Step 1) when the "Start From" button in the top right of the screen is set to Current Job. In this scenario, if set to FTE, Current Jobs within your organisation or industry with the largest number of FTEs at risk of automation are displayed at the top.

If set to %, the jobs are ordered by percentage of automation Risk. When the "Start From" button in the top right of the screen is set to "Target Job", the "FTE / %" toggle appears on the right-hand side (next to Current Jobs in Step 2). In this scenario, jobs are ordered by the Match Score and remain static. Here you can toggle between displaying number of FTEs at risk or % of automation risk. These values provide additional context when selecting which job to assess for up-skilling.

How are Skills, Knowledge, Abilities, Activities, Context and Style ordered and prioritised?

Step 3 of the Job Corridor displays the attribute skill level required for both the Current and Target Jobs. The attributes displayed under each of the six categories are ordered from the highest skill rating to the lowest for the Target Job. Each attribute has an associated range affiliated with the current and target job.  The circle represents the target job, and the diamond represents the current job. Any gap between the target and current job that needs to be filled is represented by a teal band.

What does the ‘Importance to the Future of Work’ mean when hovering over the individual Skills, Knowledge, Abilities, Activities, Context and Style components, and how is it assessed via the 1 to 5 star rating?

A star rating is used to identify those work attributes that are important in the future of work. Faethm begins with a 15-year simulation of the future impact of automation and augmentation for each occupation in an entire economy (i.e. all jobs in an economy).

We then correlate each of the 244 work attributes to the extent of automation available to each occupation. Each attribute is assigned a correlation coefficient based on their association to jobs that avoid automation: those with a high positive correlation receive a 5-star rating, while those with a low positive correlation receive a 1-star rating. Any work attributes with a negative correlation (correlated to automatable jobs) do not receive a star (i.e. anything not important receives no star rating).

In this measure it is important to note that the Star Rating is agnostic to the job, i.e. the Star Rating for Programming will be the same for a nurse, an IT software engineer and an accountant.